A histogram is handy for shooting in bright places

When you use a compact digital camera, you usually look at the monitor when taking a picture. Some cameras do not have optical viewfinders that are available on conventional film cameras. A monitor allows you to accurately frame your pictures and is convenient because of the various information that it displays. However, it may be difficult to see the monitor when outdoors on a sunny day because of the surrounding light. Not only is framing the picture difficult, it is also hard to determine the right level of exposure. A histogram can be an effective way to determine the exposure when it is difficult to see the monitor. A histogram displays the distribution of light in the subject that is framed, and is a convenient tool for determining the exposure in bright, outdoor locations. Unlike the exposure meter, a histogram displays the light distribution. You may need some time to get used to using a histogram, but once you do, it can be very convenient.

Let's look at a histogram

Shot at correct exposure: The histogram graph is not touching the left or right border, and no part of the picture is black-crushed (underexposed) or white-clipped (overexposed).
Shot at correct exposure: The histogram graph is not touching the left or right border, and no part of the picture is black-crushed (underexposed) or white-clipped (overexposed).
Shot using +1.0 exposure compensation: The histogram graph is touching the right border. In the picture, the white flower is white-clipped (overexposed), resulting in burnt-out highlight details.
Shot using +1.0 exposure compensation: The histogram graph is touching the right border. In the picture, the white flower is white-clipped (overexposed), resulting in burnt-out highlight details.
Shot using -1.0 exposure compensation: The histogram graph is touching the left border. In the picture, areas other than the white flower are black-crushed (underexposed), resulting in loss of details.

Shot using -1.0 exposure compensation: The histogram graph is touching the left border. In the picture, areas other than the white flower are black-crushed (underexposed), resulting in loss of details.
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